Canbara open medical marijuana shop

It was great to to meet some new faces

You might have heard about our office in LA (or not, which is okay too, but not really, so read about it). On June 5th, we hosted our first Dribbble meetup, a gathering of sorts with other designers. Dribbble is a community designers use to showcase work. We’ve already written about it here. The experience of being the first designer at Ueno LA comes with a ton of excitement, but it also brings a level of anxiety that I hadn’t ever felt before. Transitioning

Green field in North of France

“A possible off-the-wall idea or solution appears like a blip and disappears without us even realizing. ”FOX THEME

 

On June 5th, we hosted our first Dribbble meetup, a gathering of sorts with other designers. Dribbble is a community designers use to showcase work.

Perhaps you’ve wondered what it was like to ride a bicycle off a windswept English pier in the early 20th century. If so, check out

The film, and the innocence of its special effects, perfectly capture the bygone charm of England’s pleasure piers, which in the late 19th century helped promote seaside holidays to an increasingly well-off citizenry. Brighton — once called Old Ocean’s Bauble and compared to Biarritz, France, and now nicknamed London-on-Sea — has been home to several famous piers. Today the Brighton Palace Pier, opened in 1899, is Britain’s most popular.

The Palace Pier embraces its colorful history as wholeheartedly as it does its formidable stockpiles of kitsch, and visitors — as at Coney Island, or in parts of Las Vegas — are advised to do the same. For

 

Ordered & Unordered Lists.

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The film, and the innocence of its special effects, perfectly capture the bygone charm of England’s pleasure piers, which in the late 19th century helped promote seaside holidays to an increasingly well-off citizenry. Brighton — once called Old Ocean’s Bauble and compared to Biarritz

Medical Marijuana: Where’s the Data?

With New York State poised to become the latest inductee into the legal medical marijuana club, The New York Times explored the science behind weed’s effect on the variety of ills it’s used to treat. The paper’s verdict? Research into the medical benefits of smoked cannabis is severely lacking, and few findings point to a definitive therapeutic effect in the growing list of ailments that some physicians prescribe marijuana to treat, according to new laws. “I just don’t think the evidence is there for these long lists,” Molly Cooke, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, told the Times. “It’s been so hard to study marijuana. Policy makers are responding to thin data.”

As The Scientist reported in 2012, many researchers who would like to study the medical effects of smoked marijuana are stymied by nearly insurmountable obstacles to securing both research-grade supplies of the drug and funding for clinical studies. A scientist wishing to conduct a rigorous trial of smoked marijuana on a particular human disease must first register with the Drug Enforcement Administration and file an investigational new drug application with the Food and Drug Administration, among other formalities.

Once all these hurdles are cleared, researchers must still win funding, which is in short supply even for less-controversial work. “It’s one thing to say we need to have more research, and it’s another thing to obstruct the research,” Steven Jenison, former medical director of New Mexico’s medical cannabis program, told the Times.

Resourse: The Scientist

Can CBD oil help with migraines?

People used cannabis for thousands of years to treat headaches before it became illegal.There is a lack of scientific evidence about its safety and effectiveness for this purpose, but researchers have suggested that one or more substances present in cannabis may have therapeutic benefit for headaches, including migraines. It is important to remember that many of the studies may use the entire marijuana plant, and its effects are different than CBD oil.

There is evidence that CBD oil can reduce inflammation and pain in arthritis. It may work similarly with migraines. In a review of studies, published in 2017, researchers saw a useful and effective role for marijuana in treating migraine, but there are not enough studies on using CBD oil specifically yet. Some states have a list of specific conditions that are suitable for treatment with CBD oil, and migraines may not be on that list.

As the studies come in examining the effectiveness and side effects of CBD oil, there will be further changes in laws and recommendations. Both the causes of migraines and the possible effects of CBD remain unclear. More studies specific to the components of marijuana, such as CBD, are necessary.

Resourse: Medical News Today

What are the health risks of marijuana?

At the other end of the spectrum is the plethora of studies that have found negative associations between marijuana use and health. They are listed below. Daily marijuana use is believed to exacerbate existing symptoms of bipolar disorder among people who have this mental health problem. However, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report suggests that among people with no history of the condition, there is only limited evidence of a link between marijuana use and developing bipolar disorder. Moderate evidence suggests that regular marijuana users are more likely to experience suicidal thoughts, and there is a small increased risk of depression among marijuana users.

Marijuana use is likely to increase risk of psychosis, including schizophrenia. But a curious finding among people with schizophrenia and other psychoses is that a history of marijuana use is linked with improved performance on tests assessing learning and memory.

Resourse: Medical News Today

Medical marijuana and elderly labor

A major safety concern associated with medical cannabis is the possibility of medical use encouraging or transitioning into recreational use, which is associated with side effects that range from acute to chronic. Acute effects include intoxication, impaired cognition and motor function, elevated heart rate, anxiety, and psychosis in predisposed individuals. Chronic effects include bronchitis (from smoked cannabis), psychological cannabis dependency, loss of motivation, and cognitive deficits. By and large these effects seem to disappear on abstinence.

Medical cannabis may be riskier and perhaps contraindicated if a patient has a personal or family history of psychosis, unstable cardiac disease, and lung disease. Medical cannabis users are advised by physicians not to use tobacco, either alone or mixed with cannabis. They also are advised not to drive or operate machinery while initiating or changing doses and if impaired by the drug. Apart from possible synergistic effects of cannabis with other psychotropic medications, such as sedatives and hypnotics, there are no known major drug-drug interactions.

Resourse: Britannica